The UK is asking consumers to turn off their boilers to save the rare gas | Daily News Byte

The UK is asking consumers to turn off their boilers to save the rare gas

 | Daily News Byte

[ad_1]

(Bloomberg) — The UK is encouraging consumers to cut their energy use as part of a campaign aimed at reducing demand for power and natural gas in the face of rising bills this winter.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak’s government launched its long-awaited public energy-saving drive on Saturday, just as the country emerged from a week of freezing temperatures that boosted demand. It includes advice such as reducing the temperature on the home’s boiler and taking measures to reduce heat loss through windows and doors.

In Britain, many customers’ energy bills have more than doubled in the past year amid a historic energy crisis for the region due to Russia cutting gas supplies to Europe. UK government subsidies – which are set to fall in April – have helped limit price rises, meaning any savings from lower consumption could help cushion the blow to the Treasury.

A breakdown in the running costs of UK appliances as energy costs rise

The UK measures – halted by Sunac’s predecessor Liz Truss – come months after more aggressive energy saving plans in Europe. In France, the government unveiled sweeping measures to cut energy consumption by 10% over two years. Germany pursued its own demand-killing efforts, including banning outdoor monuments from being illuminated at night for aesthetic reasons and limiting office temperatures.

Britain’s awareness campaign, dubbed “It All Adds Up”, comes after short-term power prices in Europe rose earlier this week, as cooler winds coincided with lower wind conditions. While there were no energy shortages, demand for gas and power surged – highlighting the fragility of the region’s electricity network and a glimpse of how expensive winter can be.

A separate program run by National Grid, which encourages UK households to curb electricity demand at peak times, shows consumers are ready to change behavior to save energy, the grid’s electricity system operator said this week. Five tests of the system reduced demand by more than 780 megawatt-hours, equivalent to £2.8 million ($3.4 million) in savings.

©2022 Bloomberg LP

[ad_2]

Source link